• Help Support Hardline Crawlers :

Trail safety

The Luke

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,825
At Harlan we had two accidents happen. @Bronco72 was hammering out a U joint and a piece snapped off and stabbed my buddy right below the sternum. Split him open about an inch wide and 1/2"+ deep. We didn't have anything to button him up with. Luckily it sealed itself up after 20-30 min and didn't bleed that much. But it could have very easily gotten bad if he had been hit in a different spot.

Same trip, same guy was looking under the hood of my jeep and slipped off a rock, tumbled about 3-4 times down the hill before he finally bounced off a rock and came to a stop tangled up in the kudzu. Luckily it was a very slow roll and he didn't hit his head or anything. Just scraped the top off his knuckles. Could have been so much worse.
 
Last edited:

DrankinInTheWoods

Bandz a Make Her Dance
Messages
302
I watched a guy in an XJ break on Tub Rock at Grayrock one time and climbed under it and it rolled 2 tires over him down towards a group of people at the bottom of the hill. It hit a tree and stopped before it hit anyone else. It was for sure scary. Luckily the dude jumped up and wasn't hurt too bad. Probably had internal injuries and died at camp, but he drove his jeep out of there.
 

jeeptj99

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,899
So I was thinking about this after that guy rolled this weekend.

I took an advanced first aid class, and being in the shooting world I end up reading a lot about different medical incidents and stuff. I have a first aid kit that I carry everyday with me that if someone got stung by a bee or someone shot some I feel like I could handle it. The biggest thing is knowing how to use the stuff in the kit. Having a bad ass kit and not knowing can end up making the situation worse. I attached a link at the bottom that kind of explains what the difference between a first aid kit and an trauma kit are. I want to find a better way to mount one in my buggy, right now it rides in my back pack but there was times this weekend I left my backpack at camp.

 
Last edited:

jeeptj99

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,899
At Harlan we had two accidents happen. @Bronco72 was hammering out a U joint and a piece snapped off and stabbed my buddy right below the sternum. Split him open about an inch wide and 1/2"+ deep. We didn't have anything to button him up with. Luckily it sealed itself up after 20-30 min and didn't bleed that much. But it could have very easily gotten bad if he had been hit in a different spot.

Same trip, same guy was looking under the hood of my jeep and slipped off a rock, tumbled about 3-4 times down the hill before he finally bounced off a rock and came to a stop tangled up in the kudzu. Luckily it was a very slow roll and he didn't hit his head or anything. Just scraped the top off his knuckles. Could have been so much worse.

Then of course @ridered3 watched a guy roll this past weekend at AOP. I'll let him tell that one. But luckily he had a basic trauma kit with him and was somewhat prepared for the situation.


Poor Justin probably still rolling down that damn mountain
 

The Luke

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,825
I found this video. Not a specific kit, but a good educational video by a reputable person. The comments in the video have a full list of items in the kit he carries.

 

CHASMAN9

Hardline OG Administrator
Staff member
Messages
7,873
Here is my advice as I have put together some medical kits for various needs.
1) Include anti clod sponges1599579707717.png
DO NOT GET THE QUIK CLOT that you sprinkle on, it will mix with the blood and carry straight to their heart and kill them.
2) Baby aspirin- whenever someone looks like they might be having a heart attack, let them pop one. ( If you've had a heart attack or stroke, your doctor will likely recommend you take a daily aspirin unless you have a serious allergy or history of bleeding."
3) Throw away those suction snake bite kits with the rubber bulb and razor blade. They will only waste your time, transport to hospital immediately.

These are just a few things that I recommend, take it for what it is worth.
 

Bjeep

Member
Messages
16
It is sad to have to say this. But most of the accidents I see happen could have been avoided by wearing a SEAT BELT.......
 

The Luke

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,825
It is sad to have to say this. But most of the accidents I see happen could have been avoided by wearing a SEAT BELT.......
You're exactly right. That said, people are dumb and accidents happen.
 

rugger99

Well-Known Member
Messages
235
I carry a Trauma kit in my truck at all times. When I go out to play with the Jeep, it goes in the Jeep and is situated between the seats where I can grab it quickly if needed. When I was a K9 handler, I kept this in my K9 Tahoe where it was highly visible and easily located by anyone. When I teach on the range, it is with me just in case. Here is what I have inside... tourniquet x 2 , chest seals x4, gauze rolls x2, Quik clot gauze rolls x 2, EMS shears, medical tape, roll of elastic wrap. Now, mine is centered around a GSW type scenario but the contents can be used for various deep lacerations, arterial bleeds (tourniquet) wrapping of minor lacerations, etc... Below I have listed the links for the trauma kit bag I use as well as a quality seat belt cutter that comes with a sheath and is easily mounted anywhere. I also highly recommend people take a good first aid course that covers dealing with trauma one might find on a trail ride... deep lacerations, amputations ( think fingers from people grabbing cages during a rollover) serious bleeding. I know it can get a little costly buying the items needed and taking a training course, but that being said....can you put a value on either your life, a friends or a family member ?


 

CHASMAN9

Hardline OG Administrator
Staff member
Messages
7,873
I carry a Trauma kit in my truck at all times. When I go out to play with the Jeep, it goes in the Jeep and is situated between the seats where I can grab it quickly if needed. When I was a K9 handler, I kept this in my K9 Tahoe where it was highly visible and easily located by anyone. When I teach on the range, it is with me just in case. Here is what I have inside... tourniquet x 2 , chest seals x4, gauze rolls x2, Quik clot gauze rolls x 2, EMS shears, medical tape, roll of elastic wrap. Now, mine is centered around a GSW type scenario but the contents can be used for various deep lacerations, arterial bleeds (tourniquet) wrapping of minor lacerations, etc... Below I have listed the links for the trauma kit bag I use as well as a quality seat belt cutter that comes with a sheath and is easily mounted anywhere. I also highly recommend people take a good first aid course that covers dealing with trauma one might find on a trail ride... deep lacerations, amputations ( think fingers from people grabbing cages during a rollover) serious bleeding. I know it can get a little costly buying the items needed and taking a training course, but that being said....can you put a value on either your life, a friends or a family member ?




That's a great example/referral list to go by and I carry something similar as well. One simple item that I keep on my buggies is a Multi tool kit in a sheath zip tied to the cage directly overhead and in easy reach. I remember reading about Kenny Blume almost burning to death upside down and stuck between the rocks out in the middle of the KOH race years back because his seat belt latch was stuck. It was a section of the course where no spectators were and said the only reason why he is still hear is because he had just put his up there and had to cut the belts to get out.
As a firefighter, I always carry my multi knife that has a serrated blade for cutting and a spring loaded window breaker, as it just gives me a piece of mind just in case. IF only one person finds this helpful and does it, I feel like it has been worth mentioning this. Be safe....
 

jeeptj99

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,899
I carry a Trauma kit in my truck at all times. When I go out to play with the Jeep, it goes in the Jeep and is situated between the seats where I can grab it quickly if needed. When I was a K9 handler, I kept this in my K9 Tahoe where it was highly visible and easily located by anyone. When I teach on the range, it is with me just in case. Here is what I have inside... tourniquet x 2 , chest seals x4, gauze rolls x2, Quik clot gauze rolls x 2, EMS shears, medical tape, roll of elastic wrap. Now, mine is centered around a GSW type scenario but the contents can be used for various deep lacerations, arterial bleeds (tourniquet) wrapping of minor lacerations, etc... Below I have listed the links for the trauma kit bag I use as well as a quality seat belt cutter that comes with a sheath and is easily mounted anywhere. I also highly recommend people take a good first aid course that covers dealing with trauma one might find on a trail ride... deep lacerations, amputations ( think fingers from people grabbing cages during a rollover) serious bleeding. I know it can get a little costly buying the items needed and taking a training course, but that being said....can you put a value on either your life, a friends or a family member ?



This. All of this.
 

ridered3

Not Rigless
Messages
5,529
Couple of thoughts about trail safety but in no particular order:

*Try not to wheel alone.
*Secure all items in the vehicle.
*Wear seat belts/harnesses properly.
*Carry some form of Identification.
*Turn off the passcode/ID lock on your phone so an emergency call to your significant other/family member is possible from your phone.
*Setup Emergency Contacts with info in your phone.
*Assuming you are in a group, make sure someone in that group knows an emergency contact (not the one riding with you) and knows basic info about you (age, some medical, significant other contact info, etc).

I'm sure I'll think of others as well but that's just a few thoughts.
 

CHASMAN9

Hardline OG Administrator
Staff member
Messages
7,873
Couple of thoughts about trail safety but in no particular order:

*Try not to wheel alone.
*Secure all items in the vehicle.
*Wear seat belts/harnesses properly.
*Carry some form of Identification.
*Turn off the passcode/ID lock on your phone so an emergency call to your significant other/family member is possible from your phone. (LABEL CONTACT PERSON AS "ICE"- In case of emergency)
*Setup Emergency Contacts with info in your phone.
*Assuming you are in a group, make sure someone in that group knows an emergency contact (not the one riding with you) and knows basic info about you (age, some medical, significant other contact info, etc).

I'm sure I'll think of others as well but that's just a few thoughts.
 

stuftmunky2k

Well-Known Member
Messages
382
We had a minor incident this last weekend. Young one that was in our group got out when we stopped stood behind a rig and it slightly rolled back onto his foot. Thankfully he was fine. Scared the ever living hell out of everyone. The young one sure got a preaching to about being aware of his surroundings even while parked. Lesson was learned and we moved on. The biggest thing i see is people crowding things with phones out to get pics or videos. I think i asked at-least 3 people to this past weekend to get back or away from the situation just in case something would to have happened. Nothing did but just a precautionary thing. Luckily in our group there is fire fireghters, nurses, and emt people to where at-least one is there for almost every ride.
 

clutchee

Well-Known Member
Messages
238
One thing I notice a lot of, folks will spot or stand on the downhill side of rig. A lot of times I’ll put my hand up saying HOLD, then say, if they roll or flop your under them.
A lot of times it’s like you mentioned spotting, picture taking, etc taking.

I also see “sometimes” people put hands on cages and I’m quick to say hands inside.
 

The Luke

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,825
One thing I notice a lot of, folks will spot or stand on the downhill side of rig. A lot of times I’ll put my hand up saying HOLD, then say, if they roll or flop your under them.
A lot of times it’s like you mentioned spotting, picture taking, etc taking.

I also see “sometimes” people put hands on cages and I’m quick to say hands inside.
I've seen that a ton. Alot of these people that have super built jeeps and youtube channels are bad about that. I've not seen many things like that on the busted knuckle videos. But, more so the Bleepinjeep and some of the others. Bleepinjeep Fan ride videos was like watching an offroad version of a Final Destination Trailer/Teaser. Standing downhill, hanging off the rigs, etc...

Our group stays on top of the hands on cages pretty well. @jeeptj99 will call you out in a heartbeat.
 

Latest posts

Top